Tag Archives: cocktails

Local Events Bring Together Friends (Old and New)!

SaloonOne of the things that sets Saloon apart – and there are many – is its welcoming hospitality and its connection to the community. Saloon prides itself as a local Pre-Prohibition style bar with a speakeasy vibe, a neighborhood watering hole where old friends can catch up and new friends can be made. It’s a warm, cozy hideaway – the perfect place to dip in for a drink to unwind after a long day, or to set up shop in a deep, comfortable booth and spend a relaxing evening giving your taste buds a workout.

Saloon’s connection to the local community can also be found in its personal and intimate tasting dinners. The events are spirit-based, with dishes that compliment the flavors of the spirits, whether it’s rum,  whiskey, or mezcal.

The events are kept small, often limited to 25 people, to maintain the intimate feel of a dinner party. Beverage Director Manny Gonzales enjoys these personal experiences, sharing that “there is something special about smaller events.” Held in a warm, inviting dark wood alcove off the bar, the space is conducive to meeting people, chatting with fellow diners, and making new acquaintances.  Manny reflects fondly on past events where previous strangers had met, broke the ice with cocktails and conversation, an ended up talking all night.

Lending itself to this friendly comfortable atmosphere is not only the location but, of course, the libations. Manny carefully chooses the spirits and nurtures long relationships with local companies.  He believes that the great reps who are passionate about their product make the drinks stand out and add a personal identity to each event.

This past summer, Saloon hosted a whiskey themed event in conjunction with Bully Boy Distillers. The founders of the local Boston-based distillery, Will and Dave Willis, were present for the four-course paired dinner and were happy to chat with guests about the product. It’s these personal touches that make Saloon events so special.

November saw a whiskey and pork dinner that featured rye-based cocktails made with WhistlePig rye. Reflecting on the event, Manny pulls a hand-blown glass bottle from a shelf above the bar, a reminder of the successful event. The particular bottle, he shares, is called “102 for the 802” – 102 being the proof and 802 being the area code of the Vermont distillery.  And this is just another one of the personal touches that make Saloon events one of a kind.

But, for Manny, the recent mezcal event was personal for a different reason.  The Mexican spirit is a favorite of Manny’s and one that has ties to his lineage. His mother is from Mexico, and so the flavors of the smoky spirit and tastes of the Mexican inspired menu relayed a personal connection that made the event particularly special.

If you haven’t had the opportunity to attend one of these unique events, stay tuned and be sure to check the calendar for updates. Whatever the spirit of choice, with Manny and chef Jonathan Schick planning the menu, you know you are in for a memorable and flavorsome evening.

Saloon’s Manny Gonzales Talks Whiskey on WBUR’s “Here and Now”

SaloonSaloon Beverage Director Manny Gonzales stopped by the WBUR studios this afternoon to chat with award-winning journalist Jeremy Hobson on “Here and Now,” the acclaimed radio news show which airs on over 365 stations nationwide, as part of a segment on the American Whiskey Renaissance.

Manny was excited to share his thoughts on the emergence of craft distilleries and the future of whiskey by leading Hobson through a tasting of three whiskies, from different craft distillers around the country.

The first whiskey Manny presented was Dry Fly’s Washington Wheat Whiskey. Hobson notes the way that Manny handles the drink, tasting it as opposed to shooting it. Manny emphasized the importance of tasting, especially with a whiskey like the Dry Fly, which is “soft, delicate… a nice introduction to craft spirits.”

The second, St. George’s Single-Malt Whiskey, which is out of a craft distiller in California, is sweeter than the first, as noted by Hobson. The sweeter notes, Manny shares, are from the barley itself.

The third tasted was Prichard’s Double Barrel Bourbon based in Tennessee, a whiskey Manny praises as “one of the best on the market.”

When asked by Hobson if whiskey is one of those spirits which is better consumed in its raw form, without the additions of mixers or other elements, Manny muses that it often depends on what you are looking for in a drink, and also, which whiskey is at your disposal.  Some are better in a Manhattan or  margarita. Whiskey in a margarita?, you may ask, as Hobson did.  But whiskey is an adaptable spirit, as anyone who has experienced the creative and flavorful cocktails at Saloon can surely agree. The enthusiasm for the spirit experienced at Saloon — and felt by Manny himself —  is contagious. “A whiskerita,” he affirms, “why not?!”

Listen to the segment online.

A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities

Ah, the holidays. The time to loosen our belts, tighten our tongues around the obligatory visit with Aunt Betsy and max out a card or two. But at least we can drink: after all nothing says the birth of Christ like a case display of Jack Daniels or Jameson at your favorite package store. But the story of inebriated holiday cheer is much older than 15% off 6 bottles of assorted spirits, and whether it’s my Grandfather’s brandied eggnog, the ever famous Wassail or the resurrected cult favorite Tom and Jerry, the story is in the teller… or two.

Cat and Mouse Part 1

The latter holiday classic recalls two stories. The first is of author Pierce Egar and his work “The Day and Night Scenes of Jerry Hawthorn esp. and his Elegant friend Corinthian Tom“. The novel showcases the day and nighttime adventures or misadventures of Jerry and Tom as they cruise down London’s streets with a couple of friends looking for a good time. Think of it as like the early 19th century version of Super Bad, or License to Drive or any other story of two or three friends trying to meet women, scrape a little and have a drink or four. . .

The book later became a famous London play called “Life in London“. In the play, Egar incorporated a host of characters based on many of the downtrodden well known street beggars and pan handlers such as Ex-American slave Billy Waters who took part in a scene or two. Billy, to escape slavery like many of African descent had joined the royal British navy where he had lost his left leg. He was an impoverished but common fixture outside of many a London theater playing his violin for people waiting to see the show. For the shows’ 300 night billing he was a celebrity – the catch was that he was poorly paid, because nobody wanted to give him money to play his violin outside of the theater when they were paying money to see him play his violin inside. Kind world huh? He died 2 years later penniless. His last words were reportedly “Cuss him dam Tommy Jerry.”

To promote his book and play, Egar was said to have came up with a wintry holiday classic simply called “Tom and Jerry”. This jazzed up eggnog was and still is a must have at any holiday party.